New Teacher Advocate KDP New Teacher Advocate Fall 2016 : Page 2

7 Steps for a T N A Collaborative Data Informing & Inspiring New Teachers a Kappa Delta Pi publication Volume 24, No. 1 bit.ly/NTAF16v24 Chat By Jody Piro KDP Executive Director FAYE SNODGRESS Managing Editor SALLY RUSHMORE Assistant Editors KATHIE-JO ARNOFF LAURIE QUAY EMILY ZOSS Art Director CHUCK JARRELL NTA Advisors THERESA BECCATELLI HEATHER COWHERD ROBERT GRIGGS MADELINE KOVARIK JACQUELINE MANN LISA MURLEY ROBIN QUICK ADRIENNE REDDY GINA RILEY STEPHANIE SCHAEFER TINA SNOW NICHOLAS J. ULIANO FIRST-YEAR TEACHERS Increasingly, teachers are using data to identify and understand areas of student performance that need targeting for instructional interventions. Within the current accountability-oriented landscape, even first-year teachers must use assessment data to monitor and scaffold student learning (DeLuca & Bellara, 2013). Many teachers feel overwhelmed and uncertain when they are asked to review standardized test score data and make appropriate interpretations for use in the classroom (Mertler, 2001). As a new classroom teacher, consider using a collaborative, team approach—called a data chat—for analyzing and using standardized test scores, end-of-course data, and classroom formative assessment data for diagnostic and instructional reasons. Collaborative data chat teams embody a focus on learning through inquiry and a commitment to continuous improvement (DuFour & Eaker, 1998). Learn-ing through collaboration increases confidence with data analysis and interpretation (U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development, 2008) and scaffolds your practice of data-driven decision-making. A collaborative data chat organizes teachers into groups to communally reach competencies in data comprehension, interpretation, and use. The data chat has seven steps. ISSN 1070-7379 published four times during the school year by Kappa Delta Pi, 3707 Woodview Trace, Indianapolis, IN 46268-1158. Send all subscription orders and editorial correspondence to address above, call 1-800-284-3167, or visit KDP Online at www.kdp.org. Subscription rate: $14.00, members, per year, $25.00 for 2 years; $20.00, nonmembers, $35.00 for 2 years. Single copies, $7.00 (+s&h). Third-class bulk permit paid at Columbus, Ohio. Postmaster does not return issue to publisher with address change. Subscriber must send changes to: Kappa Delta Pi, 3707 Woodview Trace, Indianapolis, IN 46268-1158. ©2016 Kappa Delta Pi. All rights reserved.

7 Steps For A Collaborative Data

Jody Piro

Increasingly, teachers are using data to identify and understand areas of student performance that need targeting for instructional interventions. Within the current accountability-oriented landscape, even first-year teachers must use assessment data to monitor and scaffold student learning (DeLuca & Bellara, 2013). Many teachers feel overwhelmed and uncertain when they are asked to review standardized test score data and make appropriate interpretations for use in the classroom (Mertler, 2001) .

As a new classroom teacher, consider using a collaborative, team approach—called a data chat—for analyzing and using standardized test scores, end-of-course data, and classroom formative assessment data for diagnostic and instructional reasons. Collaborative data chat teams embody a focus on learning through inquiry and a commitment to continuous improvement (DuFour & Eaker, 1998). Learning through collaboration increases confidence with data analysis and interpretation (U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development, 2008) and scaffolds your practice of data-driven decisionmaking.

A collaborative data chat organizes teachers into groups to communally reach competencies in data comprehension, interpretation, and use. The data chat has seven steps.

1 Enlist the support of your building administrator. Your principl has access to recent data at your grade level or content area and will support your efforts to meet with colleagues.

2 Create a grade-level or contentarea team. Ask grade-level or contentarea colleagues to join you in a team to collaboratively analyze the most recent data set for your grade or content. Use common planning times for this purpose.

3 Incorporate state standards and local curriculum guides. Review the state or common core standards and your school district’s curriculum guides. Analyze which standards and local curricula are being assessed within the data set.

4 Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of the data set. Use guiding questions to support your analysis, such as: How well did the whole class perform? Are there any subgroups who performed well or below standard? Who are the advanced, proficient, and under performing students? Are there certain standards on which students consistently performed below grade level? Are there certain questions on which students under performed? Use numeric, graphical, and narrative descriptions to demonstrate your analysis of the strength and weakness areas.

5 Create both formative and summative assessments. This step and the next one allow seasoned teachers on your team to mentor you and other new teachers as they share their exemplary practices in assessment and instruction. Use backward mapping, a technique that starts with the end in mind. Consider which assessment procedures you might create based on the strengths and weaknesses of the assessment data. Which daily assessments will address the areas of weakness? Which summative assessments? Are there assessments that will help proficient students to reach the advanced level?

6 Create specific instructional strategies as interventions to address weaknesses. Decide as a team how you will address weaknesses with instructional interventions. Consider how you might differentiate instruction for students. Instructional strategies can be correlated to state standards. Rely on experienced teachers to guide you with reliable instructional interventions, but also consider suggesting appropriate strategies you learned from your recent teacher preparation program.

7 Write a final report for your building administrator. The report will include names of team members; the type of data set; the specific assessment; when the assessment was given; strengths and weaknesses of student performance through numeric, graphical, and narrative representations; formative and summative assessments; and instructional strategies for interventions. Remain open to suggestions from your administrator. Use your findings to impact your instruction. Revisit your interventions in future team meetings, revising as new data becomes available. (Adapted from Piro & Hutchinson, 2014).

Learning how to use data for student growth may seem overwhelming in your first year as a teacher, but when you form a team with your colleagues for ongoing, collaborative data chats, you will learn to sustain your data-driven decision-making for accountability purposes. More importantly, your data chats will inform your own instructional practices in your new classroom. Simply connect with colleagues who have a similar commitment for using data for instructional interventions, review the seven steps, and initiate your own collaborative data chat.

References

DeLuca, C., & Bellara, A. (2013). The current state of assessment education: Aligning policy, standards, and teacher education curriculum. Journal of Teacher Education, 64(4), 356–372. Doi: 10. 1177/0022487113488144

DuFour, R., & Eaker, R. (1998). Professional learning communities at work: Best practices for enhancing student achievement. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree Press.

Mertler, C. A. (2001). Interpreting proficiency test data: Guiding instruction and intervention. Unpublished manuscript (Inservice training materials), Bowling Green State University, Ohio. Retrieved from http:// www.ericdigests.org/2003-4/standardized-test.html

Piro, J., & Hutchinson, C. (2014). Using a data chat to teach instructional interventions: Student perceptions of data literacy in an assessment course. The New Educator, 10(2), 95–111. Doi: 10. 1080/1547688X.2014.898479

U. S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development. (2008). Teachers’ use of student data systems to improve instruction: 2005 to 2007. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www2.ed.gov/rschstat/eval/tech/teachers-datause-2005-2007/teachers-data-use-2005-2007.pdf

Dr. Piro is an Associate Professor in the Doctor of Education in Instructional Leadership program at Western Connecticut State University. She has been a social studies teacher, a dean, and a principal.

Read the full article at http://digital.watkinsprinting.com/article/7+Steps+For+A+Collaborative+Data/2555742/328013/article.html.

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