New Teacher Advocate Fall 2012 : Page 3

www.kdp.org newsletter. Seeing the great success enjoyed by the local chapter, I suggested asking KDP to make it a national newsletter. The rest, as they say, is history. Kappa Delta Pi’s strength always has been the synergy between local chapters and the international office, and the willingness of creative, imaginative students and chapter leaders to identify new models and approaches for service to the profession. It gives me great joy to see this project, started so long ago, continuing to flourish. I New Teacher Advocate TURNS TWENTY BY MARY C. CLEMENT What can today’s new teachers expect in the next 20 years? There is no crystal ball to provide an exact picture, but some predictions can be made. Student diversity, technology, and accountability will continue to bring changes to our schools. Economic pressures present further challenges. Big questions may arise re-garding the roles of teachers’ unions. With so much knowledge being created, the question of curriculum will be a critical one. What is the most important material to be taught and who should decide? The 2012–2013 school year will be the 20th year for the publication of the NTA and my 34th year as an educator. While I have seen many changes in education, I also have witnessed many constants. Teachers are important, both as providers of knowledge and as caregivers to students. The quality of a teacher’s education, induction, and support in the workplace remain critical factors to his or her success. I often say that teaching is a tough job—not for the faint of heart. Perhaps the quote from “Lessons Learned the First Year” in the 1993 NTA says it best. “Teaching is one of the most frustrating, challeng-ing, creative, tiring, discouraging, encouraging, and wonderful professions you can choose.” Teaching is also much too difficult and too important to do alone. All teachers need a support network. Let Kappa Delta Pi be your support network through-out your career. Remember to celebrate all of your successes along the way, just as we celebrate this milestone for the NTA . New Teacher Advocate online: http://bit.ly/NTAF12v20 In 1993 we didn’t have smartphones, iPads, or HDTV. No one was texting, checking Facebook, or watching American Idol ® . A gallon of gas cost about $1.17. In that year, “no child left behind” was the advice that the principal gave teachers before they left on field trips. School districts that had induction programs to provide mentoring and support for new teachers were considered “cutting edge.” In 1993 Kappa Delta Pi made a bold move to create a national newsletter to support new teachers, and the New Teacher Advo-cate was born. NTA , as it is familiarly called, was designed to inspire new teachers, provide them with practical advice, and help them to become established in their first classrooms. The premiere edition featured articles about interviewing for teacher jobs, successful substitut-ing, and dealing with the wide range of ability levels in a classroom. “Insights” from teachers included still timely quotes such as “You might be the most stable, caring person in a child’s life.” Those who began their teaching careers at the time when the NTA went into publication have seen many changes in education. The idea of common core curriculum standards was unheard of at that time, and state standards were in the earliest stages of implementation. Teaching with technology meant using an overhead projector, and student accountability was basically at the teacher’s discretion. Professional organizations might have been discussing merit pay, but cer-tainly not basing a teacher’s evaluation on the students’ test scores. Dr. Mehaffy currently is Vice President for Academic Leadership and Change at the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), where his division is responsible for special programs and projects in the areas of leadership and organizational change in higher education. He served as President of Kappa Delta Pi from1992 to 1994. Dr. Clement serves as President of Kappa Delta Pi for the 2012–2014 biennium. She was the first academic editor of NTA and wrote the “Lessons Learned the First Year” piece for the winter 1993 issue. She has kept every issue of the NTA and refers to them frequently for ideas. Incidentally, Dr. Clement also joined KDP in 1993 as a result of finding out about the NTA. New Teacher Advocate • Fall 2012 • 3

New Teacher Advocate Turns Twenty

Mary C. Clement

In 1993 we didn’t have smartphones, iPads, or HDTV. No one was texting, checking Facebook, or watching American Idol®. A gallon of gas cost about $1.17. In that year, “no child left behind” was the advice that the principal gave teachers before they left on field trips. School districts that had induction programs to provide mentoring and support for new teachers were considered “cutting edge.” In 1993 Kappa Delta Pi made a bold move to create a national newsletter to support new teachers, and the New Teacher Advocate was born. NTA, as it is familiarly called, was designed to inspire new teachers, provide them with practical advice, and help them to become established in their first classrooms.

The premiere edition featured articles about interviewing for teacher jobs, successful substituting, and dealing with the wide range of ability levels in a classroom. “Insights” from teachers included still timely quotes such as “You might be the most stable, caring person in a child’s life.”

Those who began their teaching careers at the time when the NTA went into publication have seen many changes in education. The idea of common core curriculum standards was unheard of at that time, and state standards were in the earliest stages of implementation. Teaching with technology meant using an overhead projector, and student accountability was basically at the teacher’s discretion. Professional organizations might have been discussing merit pay, but certainly not basing a teacher’s evaluation on the students’ test scores.

What can today’s new teachers expect in the next 20 years? There is no crystal ball to provide an exact picture, but some predictions can be made. Student diversity, technology, and accountability will continue to bring changes to our schools. Economic pressures present further challenges. Big questions may arise regarding the roles of teachers’ unions. With so much knowledge being created, the question of curriculum will be a critical one. What is the most important material to be taught and who should decide?

The 2012–2013 school year will be the 20th year for the publication of the NTA and my 34th year as an educator. While I have seen many changes in education, I also have witnessed many constants. Teachers are important, both as providers of knowledge and as caregivers to students. The quality of a teacher’s education, induction, and support in the workplace remain critical factors to his or her success.

I often say that teaching is a tough job—not for the faint of heart. Perhaps the quote from “Lessons Learned the First Year” in the 1993 NTA says it best. “Teaching is one of the most frustrating, challenging, creative, tiring, discouraging, encouraging, and wonderful professions you can choose.” Teaching is also much too difficult and too important to do alone. All teachers need a support network. Let Kappa Delta Pi be your support network throughout your career. Remember to celebrate all of your successes along the way, just as we celebrate this milestone for the NTA.

Dr. Mehaffy currently is Vice President for Academic Leadership and Change at the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), where his division is responsible for special programs and projects in the areas of leadership and organizational change in higher education. He served as President of Kappa Delta Pi from1992 to 1994.

Dr. Clement serves as President of Kappa Delta Pi for the 2012–2014 biennium. She was the first academic editor of NTA and wrote the “Lessons Learned the First Year” piece for the winter 1993 issue. She has kept every issue of the NTA and refers to them frequently for ideas. Incidentally, Dr. Clement also joined KDP in 1993 as a result of finding out about the NTA.

Read the full article at http://digital.watkinsprinting.com/article/New+Teacher+Advocate+Turns+Twenty/1146002/122476/article.html.

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