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Delta Gamma Delta Gamma Anchora Fall 2016 : Page 38

keeping the character Some of our oldest Delta Gamma houses were due for an upgrade, challenging local housing volunteers to make the house meet the needs of 2016, while also keeping the timeless feel that will make the house homey and memorable for another century of sisters. Omega-Wisconsin Julie Zogg Klein, Lambda-Minnesota, house corp president Year House Built: 1926 (annex was built in 1911) How many members live in the house? 46 women (12 in the annex) What is the benefit of updating an old house rather than starting fresh? It has a ton of character, and holds a special place in the hearts of Omega alumnae everywhere. In addition, there would have been no way we could have come up with the money necessary to rebuild a house of similar size and with similar features. What were you sure to keep during the update? We have and continue to try to make design choices that are in line with design choices that would have been made when both of our properties were built. So, we’ve tried to stick with similar color palettes and accentuate the beautiful features that exist in both properties. What are you updating? The current “big project” is the bathrooms in the main house and we wanted to: (1) create an accessible bathroom on the first floor of the chapter house so that guests and members needing an accessible bathroom would have one and (2) redesign the main bathrooms for the live-in women to make them more functional and much more beautiful. Challenges you came across? When doing construction in old homes, you always run into something. Our biggest hurdles for the bathroom renovations would include: (1) obtaining the necessary approvals from the city to purchase new windows for all the bathrooms instead of having the historic windows preserved and rebuilt, (2) obtaining the necessary approvals for the exterior HVAC vents, (3) complying with the necessary fire codes and (4) financing the incredibly expensive project. Alpha Psi-Mississippi Jane Barnes Ford, Alpha Psi-Mississippi, house corp president Year House Built: 1938 How many members live in the house? 80 beds upon completion, with the possibility of housing 120 maximum, if necessary. What character were you sure to keep during the update? We felt that our alumnae valued our traditional formal living areas ànd our beloved Founder’s Room. Interestingly, a survey that was conducted with the collegians showed that they valued the same things. What are you updating? The current house desperately needed more space for the dining room, the chapter room, more study areas and, of course, more beds/bedrooms. With a chapter of 455 members, the chapter room had young women everywhere, shoulder to shoulder on the floor and anywhere they could sit for chapter meetings. The dining room could seat 150 people, so the whole chapter could never eat together. Challenges you came across? A great challenge was the need to shift all of the electrical connections, the plumbing lines, the fire safety wiring, the cable and Wi-Fi connections to the remaining side of the house in preparation for the other side to be demolished. Also, the need presented itself for the shoring up of that remaining side where the other side was demolished by driving steel and concrete pilings. Recommendation to others remodeling older homes? My suggestion would be to find/hire an architect who values and is interested in maintaining older buildings and has the ability and interest to incorporate the old with the new. Also, be prepared for surprises when construction actually begins. Lucia Weeks Dorsey, Rho-Syracuse, house corp president Rho-Syracuse Year House Built: 1900 How many members live in the house? Currently 27, but we have had up to 31 in singles, doubles and triples. How many times has it been remodeled? An addition was added in 1941 and in the 1950s the third and second floor were updated to change it from dormitory sleeping. We haven’t done any recent big remodels. New features have been added though, including an updated sprinkler system as well as the downstairs bathroom and lighting, decorations, and we are constantly refinishing floors. What are you updating? This summer, the big project was supposed to be the entire front porch and walkway, but because we are on the Historic Register and considered a commercial property, we need to get new permits to comply to the building codes. What is the benefit of updating an old house rather than starting fresh? You continue to keep the character and history of what Rho was and is. What were you sure to keep during the update? With the bathroom, it was important to keep the style along with the rest of the house. With the porch, it is going to be not just for aesthetics, but for safety as the porch is slowly deteriorating. Challenges you came across? Being on the Historic Register, there are more hoops to jump through to get a project completed, which adds additional costs that we don’t have the funds for. What do you recommend to others remodeling older homes? Cross your Ts and dot your Is before you get excited about a project. 38 Save a tree! Save a buck! The ANCHORA of Delta Gamma Fall 2016 Read this online! Email anchora@deltagamma.org. inthehouse

In The House Keeping The Character

Some of our oldest Delta Gamma houses were due for an upgrade, challenging local housing volunteers to make the house meet the needs of 2016, while also keeping the timeless feel that will make the house homey and memorable for another century of sisters.

Omega-Wisconsin

Julie Zogg Klein, Lambda-Minnesota, house corp president

Year House Built: 1926 (annex was built in 1911)

How many members live in the house?

46 women (12 in the annex)

What is the benefit of updating an old house rather than starting fresh?

It has a ton of character, and holds a special place in the hearts of Omega alumnae everywhere. In addition, there would have been no way we could have come up with the money necessary to rebuild a house of similar size and with similar features.

What were you sure to keep during the update?

We have and continue to try to make design choices that are in line with design choices that would have been made when both of our properties were built. So, we’ve tried to stick with similar color palettes and accentuate the beautiful features that exist in both properties.

What are you updating?

The current “big project” is the bathrooms in the main house and we wanted to: (1) create an accessible bathroom on the first floor of the chapter house so that guests and members needing an accessible bathroom would have one and (2) redesign the main bathrooms for the live-in women to make them more functional and much more beautiful.

Challenges you came across?

When doing construction in old homes, you always run into something. Our biggest hurdles for the bathroom renovations would include: (1) obtaining the necessary approvals from the city to purchase new windows for all the bathrooms instead of having the historic windows preserved and rebuilt, (2) obtaining the necessary approvals for the exterior HVAC vents, (3) complying with the necessary fire codes and (4) financing the incredibly expensive project.

Alpha Psi-Mississippi

Jane Barnes Ford, Alpha Psi-Mississippi, house corp president

Year House Built: 1938

How many members live in the house?

80 beds upon completion, with the possibility of housing 120 maximum, if necessary.

What character were you sure to keep during the update?

We felt that our alumnae valued our traditional formal living areas ànd our beloved Founder’s Room. Interestingly, a survey that was conducted with the collegians showed that they valued the same things.

What are you updating?

The current house desperately needed more space for the dining room, the chapter room, more study areas and, of course, more beds/bedrooms. With a chapter of 455 members, the chapter room had young women everywhere, shoulder to shoulder on the floor and anywhere they could sit for chapter meetings. The dining room could seat 150 people, so the whole chapter could never eat together.

Challenges you came across?

A great challenge was the need to shift all of the electrical connections, the plumbing lines, the fire safety wiring, the cable and Wi-Fi connections to the remaining side of the house in preparation for the other side to be demolished. Also, the need presented itself for the shoring up of that remaining side where the other side was demolished by driving steel and concrete pilings.

Recommendation to others remodeling older homes?

My suggestion would be to find/hire an architect who values and is interested in maintaining older buildings and has the ability and interest to incorporate the old with the new. Also, be prepared for surprises when construction actually begins.

Rho-Syracuse

Lucia Weeks Dorsey, Rho-Syracuse, house corp president

Year House Built: 1900

How many members live in the house?

Currently 27, but we have had up to 31 in singles, doubles and triples.

How many times has it been remodeled?

An addition was added in 1941 and in the 1950s the third and second floor were updated to change it from dormitory sleeping. We haven’t done any recent big remodels. New features have been added though, including an updated sprinkler system as well as the downstairs bathroom and lighting, decorations, and we are constantly refinishing floors.

What are you updating?

This summer, the big project was supposed to be the entire front porch and walkway, but because we are on the Historic Register and considered a commercial property, we need to get new permits to comply to the building codes.

What is the benefit of updating an old house rather than starting fresh?

You continue to keep the character and history of what Rho was and is.

What were you sure to keep during the update?

With the bathroom, it was important to keep the style along with the rest of the house. With the porch, it is going to be not just for aesthetics, but for safety as the porch is slowly deteriorating.

Challenges you came across?

Being on the Historic Register, there are more hoops to jump through to get a project completed, which adds additional costs that we don’t have the funds for.

What do you recommend to others remodeling older homes?

Cross your Ts and dot your Is before you get excited about a project.

Read the full article at http://digital.watkinsprinting.com/article/In+The+House+Keeping+The+Character/2602725/343889/article.html.

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