Purdue Alumnus Purdue Alumnus July-Aug 2016 : Page 27

PURDUE TRADITION G DAVE MASON HOME SWEET HOME regg Mantock (S’87) was a tall, burly, analytical freshman majoring in computer science and math when he walked into Elliott Hall of Music in 1982 to audition for Purdue Musi-cal Organizations (PMO). He handed the accompanist the sheet music to “Home” from The Wiz — and met his future. The accompanist would become his wife. They would have two sons, naming one Elliott after the place where they met. Gregg Mantock was home. Only, he did not know it then. Gregg’s Purdue musical legacy began that day, but his wife Dianne (DeDe) began her legacy at birth. At age two, DeDe started taking piano lessons from her mother, Audrey McElheny, an accomplished pianist. McElheny directed the Miami County Home Extension Chorus, which performed with other Indiana extension choruses each summer during the Extension Homemakers Association Conference held at Purdue. The mass choir was directed by Albert P. Stewart, legendary PMO director. “I went to all of my mother’s rehearsals, all the festivals,” DeDe says. “I grew up in Purdue Musical Organizations.” DeDe majored in voice and minored in piano at Indiana University in the late 1970s. In the summer she was the accom-panist for her mother’s chorus. During this time, Bill Luhman, then PMO director, hired DeDe as an assistant director. Her lifelong relationship with PMO made DeDe a natural fit. “Home” begins and endures in Purdue family musical legacy In contrast, Gregg had never seen the Purdue Varsity Glee Club before he arrived on campus from Muncie, Indi-ana, in 1982. He attended the Freshman First Nighter, heard the Glee Club perform, and said, “I gotta do that.” As a member of the Glee Club, Gregg sang in the pre-mier 50s quartet, Ba-Na-Na. He was assistant manager and chairman of the Purdusirs, a select leadership group. Today, the Mantock’s son Rob mirrors his father’s expe-riences as a member of the Glee Club and a singer in Ba-Na-Na. During his upcoming senior year in film and video studies, Rob will be the assistant manager and chair-man of the Purdusirs. “I hope I can make my father proud,” Rob says. “He does whatever to get the job done, but at the same time he makes sure what he’s doing is what he loves. Knowing my dad and who he is shows how the organization shapes its students and, also, how its students shape it.” The Mantocks’ son Elliott graduated last May with a bachelor’s degree in computer science. He played trombone in nearly every Purdue band. DeDe, his professional musi-cian mother, influenced his talents. “She taught me every-thing I know about music,” Elliott says. “I was living with the best accompanist that I could possibly have.” Today, Gregg is a systems engineer for Cisco Systems. He says: “With PMO, I didn’t have to give anything but my time, but I got a lot. They took me under their wing and made me —ANGIE KLINK (LA’81) feel like I was something more.” Maybe there’s a chance for me to go back there Now that I have some direction. It would sure be nice to be back home Where there’s love and affection. —“HOME,” THE WIZ PURDUEALUMNI.ORG JULY // AUGUST 2016 27

Home Sweet Home

PURDUE TRADITION

“Home” begins and endures in Purdue family musical legacy

GREGG MANTOCK (S’87) WAS A TALL, burly, analytical freshman majoring in computer science and math when he walked into Elliott Hall of Music in 1982 to audition for Purdue Musical Organizations (PMO). He handed the accompanist the sheet music to “Home” from The Wiz — and met his future.

The accompanist would become his wife. They would have two sons, naming one Elliott after the place where they met. Gregg Mantock was home. Only, he did not know it then.

Gregg’s Purdue musical legacy began that day, but his wife Dianne (DeDe) began her legacy at birth. At age two, DeDe started taking piano lessons from her mother, Audrey McElheny, an accomplished pianist. McElheny directed the Miami County Home Extension Chorus, which performed with other Indiana extension choruses each summer during the Extension Homemakers Association Conference held at Purdue. The mass choir was directed by Albert P. Stewart, legendary PMO director.

“I went to all of my mother’s rehearsals, all the festivals,” DeDe says. “I grew up in Purdue Musical Organizations.”

DeDe majored in voice and minored in piano at Indiana University in the late 1970s. In the summer she was the accompanist for her mother’s chorus. During this time, Bill Luhman, then PMO director, hired DeDe as an assistant director. Her lifelong relationship with PMO made DeDe a natural fit.

In contrast, Gregg had never seen the Purdue Varsity Glee Club before he arrived on campus from Muncie, Indiana, in 1982. He attended the Freshman First Nighter, heard the Glee Club perform, and said, “I gotta do that.”

As a member of the Glee Club, Gregg sang in the premier 50s quartet, Ba-Na-Na. He was assistant manager and chairman of the Purdusirs, a select leadership group. Today, the Mantock’s son Rob mirrors his father’s experiences as a member of the Glee Club and a singer in Ba-Na-Na. During his upcoming senior year in film and video studies, Rob will be the assistant manager and chairman of the Purdusirs.

“I hope I can make my father proud,” Rob says. “He does whatever to get the job done, but at the same time he makes sure what he’s doing is what he loves. Knowing my dad and who he is shows how the organization shapes its students and, also, how its students shape it.”

The Mantocks’ son Elliott graduated last May with a bachelor’s degree in computer science. He played trombone in nearly every Purdue band. DeDe, his professional musician mother, influenced his talents. “She taught me everything I know about music,” Elliott says. “I was living with the best accompanist that I could possibly have.”

Today, Gregg is a systems engineer for Cisco Systems. He says: “With PMO, I didn’t have to give anything but my time, but I got a lot. They took me under their wing and made me feel like I was something more.” —ANGIE KLINK (LA’81)

INSTANT REPLAY

Grip it and rip it

That might sound a little harsh, but August Kim is out to make a name for herself. As the 2016 Big Ten Champion, the junior biochemistry major is making sure her name is prominent in the Purdue record books on the course and in the classroom. She set a Big Ten Championship record for lowest 54-hole mark that is tied for the 12th-best round in program history. Kim is also tied for the second-best 54-hole score in program history, matching Paula Reto’s mark from the 2012 Insperity Lady Jaguar Intercollegiate. At the NCAA Shoal Creek Regional, Kim tied for ninth place, sinking a birdie putt on her final hole to earn the last individual qualifying bid for the NCAA Championships. But luck doesn’t earn you repeat accolades as a two-time All-Big Ten honoree, earning first team honors in 2016 and second team recognition in 2015. In addition, Kim is a three-time Academic All-Big Ten award winner. At this year’s NCAA Championships, she tied for 32nd place. And she isn’t even done yet. As she prepares for her senior year, you can bet the best is yet to come.

—KELLY HILLER

Read the full article at http://digital.watkinsprinting.com/article/Home+Sweet+Home/2528855/318709/article.html.

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